Report on the Non-Consensual Sharing of Intimate Images

The non-consensual sharing of intimate images encompasses a range of behaviours relating to:

‘…images obtained (consensually or otherwise) in an intimate relationship; photographs or videos of sexual assault/s; images obtained from the use of hidden devices to record another person; stolen images from the Cloud or a person’s computer or other device; and pornographic or sexually explicit images that have been photo-shopped, showing the victim’s face.’[1]

Throughout this report the word ‘images’ is intended to encompass both video and still images.

The activity of sharing intimate images proliferated with the evolution of the Polaroid camera which facilitated taking private photographs without the need to engage the services of a photographic developer.  The evolution of digital photography and videography surpassed the Polaroid in the ability to quickly share images.  One of the earliest cited examples of the
non-consensual sharing of intimate images was the commercial and informal circulation of a pornographic home movie of Jayne Kennedy and Leon Isaac Kennedy in the late 1970s.  The video became available only after Jayne divorced Leon.  It was suggested that Leon released the tape to punish Jayne for leaving him.[2]  In the 1980s, the pornographic magazine ‘Hustler’ began publishing images of naked women submitted by readers, sometimes accompanied by identifying information about the women, including their names.  Some of these images were submitted without the permission of the women, and resulted in legal action (i.e. Wood v Hustler Magazine Inc. [1984] 10 Media L Rep 2113).[3]

Complete Report:

WORD (142.1 kb)   ||   PDF  (562.5 kb)

Report Sections:

Section 1 (213.9 kb)

Section 2 (203.3 kb)

Section 3 (289.7 kb)

Section 4 (329.7 kb)

Section 5 (317.8 kb)

Section 6 (368.7 kb)

Section 7 (302.6 kb)

Section 8 (290.0 kb)

Section 9 (328.0 kb)

Section10 (292.6 kb)

Section 11 (328.4 kb)

Section 12 (214.7 kb)


Last updated: 19 May 2017