Review of the Racing and Betting Act

The Racing and Betting Act 1983 (the Act) regulates the Northern Territory’s racing and betting industries, including thoroughbred and greyhound racing, oncourse bookmakers and online wagering operators (sports bookmakers).

The Act commenced in 1983 and, apart from minimal amendments to accommodate the introduction of sports bookmaker licences in the 90s, the framework largely reflects a time when individual betting shops were licensed and standing bookmakers operated at race courses. Consequently, the Act does not reference the internet, mobile technology or the significant development of the online wagering industry over the past 15 to 20 years.

To ensure the Territory remains the preferred destination for online wagering operators, and operates under a regulatory framework that reflects world best practices, including strong gambling harm minimisation measures, HWL Ebsworth Lawyers (HWLE) was engaged to review the Act with a view to developing a regulatory framework that provided powers to regulate the online wagering industry, oncourse bookmakers and racing industries, and minimised any harms associated with each, while also encouraging the entrance of new participants across all sectors.

HWLE provided a copy of their final report — ‘Review of the Racing and Betting Act — Report for the Northern Territory Government’ (Report) to the Department of the Attorney-General and Justice, outlining their vision for regulatory frameworks for the racing and betting industries.

Review of the Racing and Betting Act PDF (3.1 MB)

Making a submission

Closing date for submissions is 31 March 2020.

Comments on the reports contents can be forwarded to: Ms Anna McGill, A/ Deputy Director-General (Operations) via email anna.mcgill@nt.gov.au.

Last updated: 06 March 2020

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